Family, Carer or Kinship Responsibilities

In the ACT it is against the law for someone to discriminate against you because of a characteristic that you have, or that someone thinks you have, in an area of public life such as employment, education, accommodation, provision of goods and services, clubs.

It is against the law for someone to discriminate against you because of your family, carer or kinship responsibilities, such as having a child or children, or a person dependent upon you for their care, or responsibilities arising under kinship connections among Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander communities.

Examples of family, carer or kinship responsibilities discrimination.

Walter had worked six years for the same company when his elderly father developed dementia and required additional care. Walter took time off from work to care for him. During an interview for a promotion, he was asked questions about his responsibility as a carer and was then refused the promotion.

Karina’s boss unilaterally changed her employment status as a pharmacy assistant from full-time to part-time after she asked for time off to collect her child from a nearby school at 3pm and deliver him to after-school care. She needed a half hour break and was prepared to take a shorter lunch in order to make up the time.

Andrew is a single father with two children. When he applied for a tenancy in an apartment, the landlord told him he would have to pay extra rent because of the children.

Susie booked holiday accommodation at a guest house which offered peaceful and tranquil holidays. On phoning the guest house the day before arriving, to check that a cot could be provided for her 10 month old baby, she was told that the guest house does not accommodate children and her booking was cancelled. She was refused the refund of her deposit previously paid.

Are there any exceptions?

It is not unlawful for a person who proposes to provide accommodation on a premises that they, or a near relative or carer lives, to discriminate in the provision of that accommodation.


To find out more or make a complaint.

For more information or to make a complaint about discrimination, vilification, sexual harassment or victimisation you can contact us by:

We can provide information about the complaint process or refer you to someone who can help you further. We provide free interpreting should you need it.